"Don’t become too narrow. Live fully. Meet all kinds of people. You’ll learn something from everyone. Follow what you feel in your heart."

— Yuri Kochiyama (via youareyourmind)

"Remember that consciousness is power. Consciousness is education and knowledge. Consciousness is becoming aware. It is the perfect vehicle for students. Consciousness-raising is pertinent for power, and be sure that power will not be abusively used, but used for building trust and goodwill domestically and internationally. Tomorrow’s world is yours to build."

— Yuri Kochiyama (via thepeoplesrecord)

(Source: thepeoplesrecord)

"Death will destroy all you worked for. Thus, it is clear that life for oneself can never have any meaning."

— Leo Tolstoy, from “What I Believe” (via drawpaintprint)

consultingpiskies:

THEY ARE ALL OKAY, and all those things could exist in THE SAME WOMAN. Women shouldn’t be valued because we are strong, or kick-ass, but because we are people. So don’t focus on writing characters who are strong. Write characters who are people.madlori

Modeled on this post. This quote needed a gifset that featured a more diverse group women. Because my takeaway from Lori’s marvelous answer (seriously, go read all of it) is that representation fucking matters and that great female characters do not—and should not—fit into the same cookie cutter mold. Because actual women are not one size fits all. And the irony of having that message cross my dash repeatedly with exclusively young, white, straight, cis women who match a prescriptive definition of beauty was getting to me.

(via leighbooks)

xezene:

A true hero.

"If ever I love a man again, I will give myself to him without being bound by the rabbi or the law. And when that love dies, I will leave without permission."

— Emma Goldman

missoulapubliclibrary:

Citing the growing popularity of “slow” movements in our country, Maura Kelly at The Atlantic makes the case for a Slow Books movement that focuses on taking time to read good books, and by good books she means mostly literature. She explains:

Why the emphasis on literature? By playing with language, plot structure, and images, it challenges us cognitively even as it entertains. It invites us to see the world in a different way, demands that we interpret unusual descriptions, and pushes our memories to recall characters and plot details. […] Literature doesn’t just make us smarter, however; it makes us us, shaping our consciences and our identities. Strong narratives—from Moby-Dick to William Styron’s suicide memoir, Darkness Visible—help us develop empathy.

Despite my love for all things Internet and the quick consumption of information (it doesn’t get much quicker than Chirp Clock, which we highlighted a few days ago), this seems to me very sage advice. It’s also nothing new. Harold Bloom has been beating this drum for years. But it’s a useful reminder, because in the hustle and bustle of our technology-laden lives, there’s still nothing quite like a slow encounter with a good book.
Source: thelifeguardlibrarian
Image via soyrosa

missoulapubliclibrary:

Citing the growing popularity of “slow” movements in our country, Maura Kelly at The Atlantic makes the case for a Slow Books movement that focuses on taking time to read good books, and by good books she means mostly literature. She explains:

Why the emphasis on literature? By playing with language, plot structure, and images, it challenges us cognitively even as it entertains. It invites us to see the world in a different way, demands that we interpret unusual descriptions, and pushes our memories to recall characters and plot details. […] Literature doesn’t just make us smarter, however; it makes us us, shaping our consciences and our identities. Strong narratives—from Moby-Dick to William Styron’s suicide memoir, Darkness Visible—help us develop empathy.

Despite my love for all things Internet and the quick consumption of information (it doesn’t get much quicker than Chirp Clock, which we highlighted a few days ago), this seems to me very sage advice. It’s also nothing new. Harold Bloom has been beating this drum for years. But it’s a useful reminder, because in the hustle and bustle of our technology-laden lives, there’s still nothing quite like a slow encounter with a good book.

Source: thelifeguardlibrarian

Image via soyrosa

"To be hopeful in bad times is not just foolishly romantic. It is based on the fact that human history is a history not only of cruelty, but also of compassion, sacrifice, courage, kindness. What we choose to emphasize in this complex history will determine our lives. If we see only the worst, it destroys our capacity to do something."

— (via junellegrace)

(via junellegrace-deactivated2013113)

from-the-nether-news:

Abby Martin covering the Barrett Brown case—August 14, 2013 

Bradley Manning Trial

Why does the court keep going into a closed session if, from what I know, most, or all, of the documents being cited by the witnesses in these closed sessions are available online?

It makes no sense.

The secrecy that has plagued the Obama administration’s policies (Drone strikes, the NSA, the pursuit of whistleblowers) is essentially saying to the people: “We will do what we want (of course, as long as it is in the “national interest”) and we don’t have to tell anyone about it.” 

It’s not fair. It’s not fair that we had to find all these things out from Bradley Manning. It’s not fair that you were killing people, torturing people, spying on us, and you didn’t tell us. And it’s not fair that you’re trying the only man who had the guts to tell us.

And now, it’s not fair that we can’t know why he’s being tried or how he’s being tried.